Interference With Contractual Relations

When two individuals or businesses have established a contractual relationship with one another and a third party intentionally disrupts that contractual business relationship, the business that has suffered harm can bring a lawsuit for intentional interference with contractual relations.

However, in order to prevail on this claim, the plaintiff must establish:

  1. The existence of a valid contract between the plaintiff and a third party;
  2. Defendant knew the existence of the contract and the business relationship between the plaintiff and the third party;
  3. Defendant intended to disrupt the performance of the contract between the plaintiff and the third party;
  4. Defendant’s intentional conduct prevented performance or disrupted the performance of the contract between the plaintiff and the third party; and
  5. Defendant’s intentional disruption caused harm to the plaintiff.

The intent element requires plaintiff to establish that the defendant intended to cause the harm (or knew that was substantially likely to occur), not just the act that resulted in the harm. And, intentional interference with “at-will” contract is actionable under this theory of liability.

Handling Claims Involving Contract Interference in Southern California

To set up a free initial consultation, please e-mail us or call (213) 891-0777. Our experienced and knowledgeable business litigation attorneys specialize in breach of contract litigation and are available to meet with you between the hours of 8:30 am and 6:00 pm, Monday through Friday, and evenings and weekends by appointment.